There is this impression that the fans are crazy, but they’re not – they’re very respectful. They don’t overstep the mark. I get a lot of fan mail. Of course, some of it is a bit creepy, but mostly it’s very moving and creative. People send me drawings and their own versions of Sherlock stories. It’s a source of escapism for people and that’s great.
— Andrew Scott (x), demonstrating how to react correctly when a reporter asks about the fans (via accidentalsocialcommentary)
Reblogged from disequilibrium

enigmaticpenguinofdeath:

Happy Gatiss Wednesday!

A great excuse to celebrate with photos of just a few of the ways Mark succeeds at being a total cutie.

Reblogged from disequilibrium

geeky-anglophile:

That’s some serious neck and hair porn. Do you agree?

Reblogged from disequilibrium

timeohlord:

timeohlord:

finding good fanfiction:image

finding more good fanfiction from the same author: image

Reblogged from Lola Thimble

havetardiswilltimetravel:

"You’re letting him down, Sherlock. John Watson is definitely in danger…"

Reblogged from Van Buren Super Nova

The Mythical ‘Normal’ Fan

urbanhymnal:

I’ve seen a lot of talk about what ‘normal’ fans do, and I think it is rather interesting because it isn’t a question of whether or not people ship or pick up on subtext or craft AUs in their head— it is honestly just an issue of scale. 

In the past few years, I have taught ASiS and ASiP to my students. I don’t mention fandom in class. I don’t talk about fanfiction or ships or ‘OMG They should totally kiss.’ My students are not in fandom. When I had them set up a tumblr as part of a daily writing assignment, most of them said, “What’s tumblr?” Out of about 200 students, only two of them mentioned that they had heard of Sherlock before we watched it in class; most of them thought Sherlock Holmes was just “that movie with Iron Man.” (I may have gone back to my office and smacked my head against my desk a little when a student suggested that Sherlock Holmes was based on Batman.) 

But here is the thing: I teach developmental students. Most of my students have never read a book before they took my class or the last book they read was way back in the 3rd grade. They don’t write outside of text messages to their friends. We approach Sherlock Holmes in a basic— if fun— fashion. My students are learning comprehension skills and learning how to write paragraphs, so we don’t have a whole lot of time to talk about this or that camera angle. The purpose of the assignment is to encourage them to read intensely and practice their writing skills by comparing the two versions of the story.

And this is what I have learned and observed about the ‘normal’ Sherlock viewing audience during the course of the class. 

Read More

Reblogged from Urban Hymnal

Honestly, Sixsmith, as ridiculous as that thing makes you look, I don’t believe I’ve ever seen anything more beautiful. 

Reblogged from be a cartoon heart
Reblogged from The Cutter Alicia
Reblogged from oh, don't mind me.
Reblogged from Lola Thimble
kissikissi:

Goodbye Sherlock….
This year, my boyfriend James really wanted to get me into watching BBC’s Sherlock with him. And so in oder to get me ready for season 3 (I never watched any of it before..) we had a proper Sherlock catch-up during Christmas, watching all episodes from previous seasons and now… not only I’m totally hooked up but also I cannot believe it’s already all over for another year :(
Check out his own little goodbye image here.

kissikissi:

Goodbye Sherlock….

This year, my boyfriend James really wanted to get me into watching BBC’s Sherlock with him. And so in oder to get me ready for season 3 (I never watched any of it before..) we had a proper Sherlock catch-up during Christmas, watching all episodes from previous seasons and now… not only I’m totally hooked up but also I cannot believe it’s already all over for another year :(

Check out his own little goodbye image here.

Reblogged from Moonblossom
Reblogged from Moonblossom